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Heart Connection: A Meditation for you and Your Animals



     We all know the restorative power of meditation and its related modalities such as guided visualization, chanting, deep breathing, the combinations which create powerful inner experiences that not only calm the body and mind but that open channels to the spiritual realm, whether it is our own higher self or the messengers of Light that accompany us on our journey. Those of us who meditate in our homes with our animals present know that as we slow down the mental chatter and reach elevated levels of awareness, our pets undergo notable changes as well.  We see this as they settle in and begin audible deep breathing, often going so far out into the ethers that when we return to waking consciousness we find they are still in the depth of the meditation.  It looks like slumber, but it isn’t.  They’re traveling to higher planes with us, and they do this easily.
     The explanation is their openness and receptivity to the subtle energies that surroune us;  they eagerly join our silent journeys, grateful for the opportunity to share that loving plane where word and action are not necessary. The beauty of meditation is that we discover those eneregies are not merely external; at our core we find that same peaceful place, the soul dimension, where we can truly be our original selves, non-physical   Once we reach this plane of simple being, we operate on higher frequencies and communicate strictly through heart and mind.  The energy of pure love fills us and we become that love.  Meditation with our animals is actually a union of hearts.  Here is a simple guided meditation to help you connect with furry and feathered family in this way. 

First, play some healing music that facilitates the quiet you seek.  I like to use Aeoliah’s Music for Reiki, the Eternal Om, Tibetan singing bowl sounds, or Native American flute and chants.  If you don’t have something handy, you can find meditation-length recordings like this on You-Tube.  They range from 20 minutes to hours long.  For this meditation, I prefer to use a steady drumbeat with rhythmic chanting. Drumming represents the earth's heartbeat. As you listen be aware of your own heartbeat and how it's connected to all life
     Sit comfortably with your animals alongside you and prepare to receive.  Listen to the drums and begin to feel the drums around and then within you.  Feel the beat of your own heart.  See how you and the universe share this heartbeat.  Connect through your heart to all life.

     As you resonate with the drum, see yourself open to the  healing Light of the Universe….whatever name you give this Higher Energy, know it as the force that moves through us all.  Let this healing force fill you,  energy spiraling in  from head to toe. Be aware of your breath….breathe deeply, slowly.  When you exhale, release anything that is not Light.

     Visualize this healing light concentrating in your heart center....then let it flow our from your center  as band of white light.  See this light entering your animal’s animal's heart center.  Keep breathing as you hold this vision.  See yourselves connected by this band of light.  Feel your hearts beating together. Sit like this for a minute or two.

     In the stillness, be open to receive any messages that come from your animals or your spirit guides....all pictures, words, sensations  come to you as gifts.  Thank your guides, thank the Universe, and gently wake up your peaceful pets.  Namaste!




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