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THE GIFT OF REIKI

Reiki is a gift that last a lifetime (and more).  It is actually Universal Life Energy that is transferred from the spirit through the Reiki practitioner to the client, who can be any species  or any vegetation, or I'll say, any object.  Yes, I've used Reiki on inanimate objects quite a few times.  You can Reiki your food to eliminate impurities.  You can Reiki your aura to cleanse it of unwanted energies.  You can Reiki newly acquired quartz crystals and other stones to cleanse and ready them for  use.  Most importantly, for me is its use on animals and hopsice patients. 

If I say the word Reiki, my macaw assumes his relaxed, fluffy neck position with his head cocked and his claws in his mouth and he fits his head perfectly into the palm of my hand to receive his energy boost.  My female Irish Water Spaniel responds to the word "aura."  When I say "aura!" she lies on her back, legs open, ready to receive a Reiki bath.

I took my first Reiki class at the insistance of a nurse friend.  She had seen a demonstration and wanted it as an adjunct to her work in a substance abuse rehab facility.  I had no intention to be a healer as the psychic modality spoke louder to me, but I went and invested in the class, knowing all methods of vibration raising would add more Light to my life.  At the time I had a very sick standard poodle who struggled with auto-immune disease and bloody colitis.  Nothing worked to reverse his condition but when I returned hom after the Reiki I initiation and placed my hands on his belly in response to the almost unearthly noises emanating from him, he went right to sleep and the violin like screeching of his colon stopped.  Did Reiki cure him?  No.  He eventually died of bloat....but in the year that he did suffer with the disease I was able to provide relief and a whole lotta love.  That's the gift of Reiki: a whole lotta love, and we know love to be the greatest healing tool of all.  My message from Spriit was to focus on healing before all else, and only when I did that earnestly did my clairvoyance and intuition sharpen.

Healing is not curing.  Reiki is an Eastern concept, not a Western band-aid.  It works on the phsyical, emotional, and spiritual levels. sometimes subtly, sometimes profoundly, but it always works to brings us to our hightest selves.  In fact, some people profess that their intuition magnifies after Reiki inititation.  It is taught in three levels, with at least 21 days between levels I and II and at least a year between levels II and III.  Level one is basic attunement and hand positions; level II is distance and emotional plane healing; level 3 in the traditional Usui system (which I practice) is Master level that brings with it teacher status.  The most delicious benefit of being a Reiki practioner is that you serve as a channel;  every time you administer Reiki to someone else and it moves through you, you are receving a Reiki healing yourself.

I AM OFFERING A REIKI I CERTIFICATION CLASS ON MAY 25 FROM 11-4 IN FORT LAUDERDALE.   Cost is $100 in advance.  You will receive three attunements, the history of REIKI,  learn the handpositions, and engage in hands-on practice.  E-mail me with quesitons:
chakrasix@aol.com  or call me at 954-254-8405.


I also invite you to join our Distance Reiki Circle for Animals on Facebook every Sunday at 9 am. Eastern and 6 p.m. Pacific time.  Just type in the FB search bar "Animal Reiki Circle" and it will lead you to the page and an invitation request.

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