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VIRTUAL REIKI CIRCLE FOR ANIMALS

Just a quick January note to all of you and to those who might be visiting the blog for the first time.

Every Sunday at 9 a.m. Eastern and 6 p.m. Pacific time we hold a distance Reiki circle for animals (and their people). Follow the link and ask to join, and I'll extend membership.

http://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/152536941490184/

This is a chance for all of us to sit wherever we are and tune in for 15 - 30 minutes while I send Reiki energy through the ethers and you and your animals receive it and send positive healing thoughts to the rest of the circle. It is a time when we slow down and open up to the Light. Feel free to write during the week and ask for special healing for those animals you know are in need.

What must you do? Nothing but breathe deeply and feel the good vibrations.

If you are unfamiliar with Reiki, please check out my web page that explains Reiki, especially as it is received by animals.
http://reikidogs.com/reiki.html

I hope to see you there. Remember, if you're in the South Florida vicinity, have Reiki, will travel. We can have a live animal Reiki circle in any one of our beautiful dog parks. Let me know!

Comments

Anonymous said…
Very nice post and straight to the point. I don't know if this is actually the best place to ask but do you guys have any ideea where to hire some professional writers? Thank you :)
Kettler Trimmstation Swing Set

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