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What Concerns the Animals vs. What Concerns Us: How Readings Clarify Their Needs

Human beings too often assume that their particular worries, needs, and concerns are shared by their animals.  If we have a blind dog, for instance, and we worry about his inability to navigate the house, fearing he'll bump into walls or tumble down a few stairs, we naturally assume the dog has these same anxieties.  When we bring a rescue dog into our home and see  some behavioral clues that all was not well in his previous home, we assume that the trauma will remain central to his consciousness forever.  I've learned through my readings that this is not always the case, that the most valuable gift of animal communication is that instead of  projecting our own anxieties onto our animals we can learn what our animals actually feel and need.  With animal communication sessions, the reader gets information objectively to steer the human toward the most relevant issue that the animal expresses.

Take, for example, the case of the blind dog.  One of my dogs went blind at age 9, and as dogs are so resilient and resourceful, he was able to keep his affliction hidden until he suffered a few mishaps.  One was repeatedly tripping down the last three steps of the new house (our prior home had fewer steps).  The clearest signal was his running in a patio and not seeing the pool -- he just walked into the deep end and seemed to panic when he went down into the water.  I jumped in and led  him to the shallow end and up the steps.  Of course we saw a vet who confirmed his blindness but I grew to learn that dogs do not depend on their vision so much as their scent abilities, and my blind senior continued to be led into mischief by his very acute sense of smell.  I served as his "guide person" for the next three years until he lost his hearing,  How sad and vulnerable I assumed he felt.  But in this case my assumption was correct.  When I read for him, he told me he did not want to continue this way and asked me to release him.

Last week I did a number of mini readings at an animal communication workshop.  These are similar to the kinds of billet readings you see in metaphysical churches, but instead of a message, I held photos of individual animals I knew nothing about.  All the readings brought forth information from animals eager to share their situation.  One of them showed me immediately that the world seemed upside-down or on its side.  He wanted his owner to know he had a hard time configuring perspective, and the words came to me this way: "He wants you to know he does not see things the way the rest of the world does.  He doesn't know if things are upside down or sideways."  She responded, "He's blind." 

The dog did not identify himself as blind or handicapped.  His inability to see did not bother him.  What was important to him was that his  caretaker  learn that he didn't quite understand spatial relationships.  This helps human to realize his real issue -- not lack of vision but confusion -- so she does not pity him but understands specifically where he needs help.

Another of these readings was for a small rescue.  His new "mom" knew he had just left a very traumatic living situation and wanted to know how badly scarred he was.  Every time I closed my eyes as I held his photo, a giant cat face appeared.  When I tried to retrieve information about his life before rescue, just as I was on the verge of  seeing something, the giant cat face appeared again.  I stopped and told her,  "He seems obsessed with a huge cat.  Every time we start to focus on his last home, he shows me this giant cat face."  His human caretaker fully understood and seemed very relieved.  "YES!" she shouted.  "He is so petrified of cats, to the extreme, that one day he went into our spare room where he cat was and he was literally screaming and frozen.  I had to get him out of there."  What this reading showed her was that her anxities about his former mistreatment were unnecessary.  He had gotten over his abuse.  What he needed to  overcome was his exaggerated fear of cats, and now she had something worth a deeper focus.

Our dogs, cats, birds often surprise us by revealing issues that stray from our expectations.  Learning to tune in ourselves means moving ourselves out of the way so we can access the purity of the message.

I am am available for classes and private consultations to help you retrieve the information you need for you and your animals to live most blisfully in the short time you share together.

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